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UPDATE: Fire Brought Under Control And Damping Down Operations At Waste Management Site In Birkenhead


Tuesday, 08 April 2014
Wallasey Bridge Road, Birkenhead.
Firefighters have dealt with a fire at a skip yard in Birkenhead.

The fire at the premises on Wallasey Bridge Road has involved around 10,000 tonnes of waste material.

Merseyside Fire & Rescue Service was called out at 11.08am on Monday, April 7, and got the fire under control.

The fire caused large plumes of smoke across Poulton Bridge Road.

Three fire appliances were sent to the scene and firefighters carried out the process of damping down during Monday afternoon. There were no reports that anyone was injured in the incident.

The cause of the fire is being investigated.

Mechanical diggers were still in use at the site at 4.52pm moving waste materials to prevent any fire spread and to help firefighters with their damping down operations.

By 6.59pm on April 7 two main jets and a ground monitor, which can be set up on the ground to place water onto one area, were in use at the site. Fire crews from Heswall and West Kirby community fire stations were at the site until nearly 8pm on Monday night, April 7.

Group Manager Paul Murphy, Merseyside Fire & Rescue Service District Manager for Wirral, said: “Fires involving waste materials, particularly those involving large volumes of waste materials, can take some time to deal with and to make sure there are no further signs of fire.

“Firefighters worked well in quite challenging conditions to bring this fire under control and to carry out extensive damping down operations.

“Fire crews visited the site during the night after leaving at 7.52pm on Monday evening and have visited the site again on Tuesday morning to liaise with staff there. Thermal imaging cameras were also used during their visit overnight to check temperatures in the waste material to see if there were any signs of a fire.”

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